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Eleanor McHugh

Software Architect, Privacy Evangelist, and Freelance Reality Consultant

Eleanor McHugh/ Hacker Ellie is the sometime writer of A Go Developer's Notebook. Her career has spanned three decades working on projects ranging from mission critical avionics and broadcast transmission networks to banking security and digital trust arbitration. Her languages of choice include Golang, Ruby and Crystal whilst necessity often finds her working with C and Bash.

Ellie is co-founder of Innovative Identity Solutions, a London-based startup focused on driving innovation in digital identity, personal data privacy and secure communications with a particular emphasis on novel blockchain architectures. Along with her business partner she's co-inventor of several patents in digital identity and biometric liveness

As a responsible parent Ellie enjoys polyhedral dice, home brewing and gothic music.

Upcoming Activities

Eleanor McHugh
Code Mesh V
Tutorial/ 05 Nov 2020
20.00 - 23.30

An Introduction to Functional Programming in Go

Join Eleanor McHugh in a relaxed workshop setting to explore functions in Go both as a mathematical abstraction and as useful little machines for getting stuff done. There'll be a couple of simple problems to illustrate the ideas we’ll be covering, plenty of code you can study later, and a few thought-provoking examples which may permanently change the way you think about Go and about coding.

 

EXPERTISE

Intermediate

 

COURSE DURATION

Half day

 

TARGET AUDIENCE

  • Anyone with an interest in learning Go. 
  • Anyone who already knows Go and would like to explore functional programming. 
  • Anyone who likes closures.

 

PREREQUISITES

It will be helpful (though not necessary) to install Go and read the basic docs at http://golang.org/

WHY YOU SHOULD ATTEND THIS COURSE

Every coder thinks they know functions. Neat little packages of code for hiding away all that ugly implementation detail we only want to write once and would prefer no one else ever saw. In fact we take them so much for granted that when academics wax lyrical about their amazing potential we tend to assume they’re talking about the very same thing and wonder what all the fuss is about. Especially when presented with languages like Haskell which read more like a maths textbook and come with that knowing smile our parents had when telling us to eat our green vegetables: this is better for you.

They’re essentially saying our functions aren’t proper functions. That we’ve embellished them with junk we don’t need and that by using a pure functional language we’ll build healthier programs.

But what if I were to tell you that for all it’s practical engineering bias Go has a pretty robust concept of what a function is and how it can be used that means we can steal insights from the academic world? That we can choose to be functional programmers when we want to and - heresy of heresies - use other paradigms when they make more sense for the problem at hand?

Join the half-day tutorial to find out the answer!

 

Eleanor McHugh
Code Mesh V
Tutorial/ 04 Nov 2020
13.00 - 16.30

An Introduction to Functional Programming in Go

Join Eleanor McHugh in a relaxed workshop setting to explore functions in Go both as a mathematical abstraction and as useful little machines for getting stuff done. There'll be a couple of simple problems to illustrate the ideas we’ll be covering, plenty of code you can study later, and a few thought-provoking examples which may permanently change the way you think about Go and about coding.

 

EXPERTISE

Intermediate

 

COURSE DURATION

Half day

 

TARGET AUDIENCE

  • Anyone with an interest in learning Go. 
  • Anyone who already knows Go and would like to explore functional programming. 
  • Anyone who likes closures.

 

PREREQUISITES

It will be helpful (though not necessary) to install Go and read the basic docs at http://golang.org/

WHY YOU SHOULD ATTEND THIS COURSE

Every coder thinks they know functions. Neat little packages of code for hiding away all that ugly implementation detail we only want to write once and would prefer no one else ever saw. In fact we take them so much for granted that when academics wax lyrical about their amazing potential we tend to assume they’re talking about the very same thing and wonder what all the fuss is about. Especially when presented with languages like Haskell which read more like a maths textbook and come with that knowing smile our parents had when telling us to eat our green vegetables: this is better for you.

They’re essentially saying our functions aren’t proper functions. That we’ve embellished them with junk we don’t need and that by using a pure functional language we’ll build healthier programs.

But what if I were to tell you that for all it’s practical engineering bias Go has a pretty robust concept of what a function is and how it can be used that means we can steal insights from the academic world? That we can choose to be functional programmers when we want to and - heresy of heresies - use other paradigms when they make more sense for the problem at hand?

Join the half-day tutorial to find out the answer!