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Veronica Lopez

Member of the Kubernetes Core Team

Veronica is a former physicist turned computer scientist, who currently finds joy building distributed systems with Go and Elixir, and trying to make physics and computers converge.

Past Activities

Bryan Hunt / Veronica Lopez / David Schainker / Thomas Depierre / Jani Leppanen / Jake Morrison
Code Mesh V
06 Nov 2020
21.25 - 22.05

Panel Discussion: The number of orchestration technologies is too damn high!

Service orchestration technologies are an essential tool to manage the chaos of modern application development and infrastructure scaling, but the choices can feel overwhelming. Where should a team get started on their service orchestration journey? How do they ensure this choice can benefit the team’s use case for years to come? David Schainker will facilitate a panel bringing the expertise of Jani Leppanen, Verónica López, Thomas Depierre, and Brian Hunt with the goal of bringing clarity to the fog of such decision making.

Our panelists will discuss their orchestration technology of choice and why it matters to them. We’ll hear about how to learn the ropes, how these technologies boost developer efficiency, how to staff the team to use this technology, and how to get management on board with leveraging newfound efficiencies.

Veronica Lopez
Code BEAM STO V
11 Sep 2020
18.40 - 19.20

Kubernetes and the Beam

Containers are the ultimate commodity tool for horizontal scalability of modern systems. However, with so many features that overlap with BEAM capabilities, sometimes it's hard to see the real benefit of integrating them into our workflows.

OBJECTIVES

In this talk Veronica will share her experience with containers and Kubernetes, including flexible autoscaling and refined testing & delivery experiences, that make sense within an Elixir environment and its tools.

Francesco Cesarini / Veronica Lopez
Code BEAM V
28 May 2020
15.15 - 15.45

The Future of Programming

Whilst Erlang has been ahead of the curve for decades, other communities and technologies are quickly catching up, but not always in the most efficient way. In this talk, Francesco and Veronica share their experiences on the past, present and future of distributed software development in the Erlang Ecosystem. By looking at how systems which by nature were distributed and learning from past mistakes, they map out the evolution of where we are heading, and what we need to do to get there.

Veronica Lopez
Code BEAM Lite Amsterdam
28 Nov 2019
16.25 - 17.05

The BEAM in the Cloud Native era

Modern microservice architectures are constantly trying to replicate, with thousands of lines of bash and Go (mostly), features that the BEAM offers out of the box. Although it is said that imitation is the best form of flattery, in this talk we will go through some of the most popular constraints and pitfalls of cloud native architectures that could be more efficiently solved or even dismissed thanks to Elixir (or the BEAM)’s capabilities. 

We will discuss the impact on effort and resources that the current approach represents for companies and users, but also including a positive review on how can Elixir coexist and take advantage of the current cloud native tooling catalogue without overlapping or overengineering a project. 

OBJECTIVES

The objective is to describe the role that the BEAM currently has in the Cloud Native ecosystem, including useful tooling. But it also highlights the fact that cloud native computing patterns are strongly influenced by the principles of the Erlang Virtual Machine, even when written in other languages.

AUDIENCE

Anyone wwanting to learn more about Cloud Native development.

Veronica Lopez
Code BEAM SF 2019
01 Mar 2019
12.15 - 12.40

Containers & orchestration: The Elixir way

Containers are the ultimate commodity tool for horizontal scalability of modern systems. However, with so many features that overlap with BEAM capabilities, sometimes it's hard to see the real benefit of integrating them into our workflows.

OBJECTIVES

In this talk Veronica will share her experience with containers and Kubernetes, including flexible autoscaling and refined testing & delivery experiences, that make sense within an Elixir environment and its tools.

Veronica Lopez
Code Mesh LDN 2018
08 Nov 2018
11.25 - 12.10

Verifying a distributed system with combinatorial topology

Formal verification of distributed systems is hard and expensive. Modern systems rely on tools like observability, extensive testing, and more recenty, chaos engineering. Understanding the maths behind distributed computing, and being able to express systems in terms of algebraic topology and graph theory brings a new possibility of formal verification and a new approach towards solving complex problems and their interconnections.

OBJECTIVES

Propose a faster way to verify a distributed system, communicating the application of combinatorial topology in real world problems.